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Isolated portal vein thrombosis

In chronic pancreatitis (CP) portal vein thrombosis (PT) is a less well known complication than splenic vein thrombosis (ST). In the literature up until 1990, 26 cases with PT, have been reported and only 10 cases presented a isolated PT, without ST. We report a new case of isolated PT without ST in Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) refers to thrombosis that develops in the trunk of the portal vein including its right and left intrahepatic branches and may even extend to the splenic or superior mesenteric veins or towards the liver involving intrahepatic portal branches Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) is a blood clot of the portal vein, also known as the hepatic portal vein. This vein allows blood to flow from the intestines to the liver. A PVT blocks this blood.. Portal vein thrombosis is an unusual thrombotic condition not frequently seen in the general population; however, it has a higher prevalence in special circumstances such as in liver cirrhosis and hepatic or pancreatic malignancy. It also can be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. In this review, we discuss the current data.

[Isolated portal vein thrombosis: a rare complication of

Isolated obstruction (mainly due to thrombosis) of the splenic vein usually results in left-sided portal hypertension and isolated fundal varice formation. This syndrome is a rare cause of gastrointestinal bleeding. Pancreatic diseases are among the most common etiologies of splenic vein obstruction Portal vein thrombosis, like thrombosis elsewhere, can occur due to disturbance of any one of the Virchow triad, and causes can be thought of in these terms 1,2: reduced flow / portal hypertensio Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) is a complication of decompensated cirrhosis and is more likely to occur during late-stage liver cirrhosis1, with a prevalence of approximately 1 per cent in the general population2. Studies have shown that PVT develops in 5-20 per cent of cirrhotic patients3,4

Doppler of the portal system pathologies

Portal hypertension-related complications at PVT diagnosis were present in 65 (81.3%) patients. Isolated portal vein trunk/branch thrombosis was present in 53 (66.3%) patients. AT was started in 37 patients. AT was stopped in 17 (45.9%) patients, in 4 (10.8%) due to bleeding events. No variceal bleeding occurred while on AT Portal vein thrombosis is an unusual thrombotic condition not frequently seen in the general population; however, it has a higher prevalence in special circumstances such as in liver cirrhosis and hepatic or pancreatic malignancy. It also can be associated with significant morbidity and mortality Isolated portal vein thrombosis is a well-described feature. Patients with chronic venous outflow obstruction involving the hepatic veins often develop bridging necrosis. Venocentric hepatocyte dropout and fibrosis is common. Zone 1 hepatocytes are at greater risk for necrosis than Zone 2 or Zone 3 hepatocytes

Portal Vein Thrombosis - PubMed Central (PMC

  1. According to recent studies, the lifetime risk of getting portal vein thrombosis (PVT) in the general population is reported to be 1%. The reason for getting PVT is unknown and remains unresolved. The blood clot typically completely blocks the portal vein makes the blood to flow back causing high pressures
  2. Portal Vein Thrombosis is a pathological condition concerning the liver in which the portal vein which carries blood from the intestines to the liver gets blocked or thrombosed as a result of a clot
  3. Background: It may involve thrombosis of splenic vein (SplV), portal vein (PV) and superior mesenteric vein (SMV), either separately or in combinations, and often detected incidentally, indeed some cases present with upper gastrointestinal bleed, bowel ischemia and hepatic decompensation
  4. Abstract Isolated splenic vein thrombosis may lead to a specific clinical presentation, namely, bleeding from isolated gastric varices (which are difficult to diagnose), splenomegaly, and normal liver function. The most common cause is pancreatic disease
  5. portal vein thrombosis. Methods Retrospective multicentre study of all patients registered with the diagnosis of portal vein thrombosis between 1995 and 2004. Results A total of 173 patients (median age 57 years, 93 men) with portal vein thrombosis were identified and followed up for a median of 2.5 years (range 0-9.7)
  6. Complications included isolated hepatic artery thrombosis in 7 patients (35%), isolated portal vein thrombosis in 6 patients (30%), isolated hepatic vein stenosis in 3 patients (15%), and isolated hepatic artery stenosis in 1 patient (5%)
  7. Herein, we report an unusual case of an infiltrative HCC initially presenting with isolated malignant portal vein thrombosis and provide a brief review of the literature regarding the infiltrative HCC subtype. Additionally, we demonstrate how sonoelastography could aid in detecting the appropriate biopsy area in the infiltrative HCC subtype

isolated thrombus can occur in the splenic vein (rare in SMV or IMV alone) mesenteric thrombosis occurs when all the mesenteric veins are occluded with thrombus over time recanalisation and collateral vessel formation can occur (portal cavernoma Portal vein thrombosis is frequently associated with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Tumor invasion into the portal vein by direct venous extension or metastasis occurs in up to 70% of HCC patients (Cedrone et al., Liver 16:94-8, 1996). However, presentation as an isolated malignant portal vein thrombosis without any evidence of obvious hepatoma-like lesions in the liver by imaging studies. Depending on the site of thrombosis, patients are at risk of developing liver insufficiency, portal hypertension, or bowel infarction and may experience recurrence in both the splanchnic veins and other vein segments Patients with isolated portal vein thromboses had symptoms and intestinal infarction in 16/41 (39%) and 0/41 (0%) of the cases, respectively, whereas superior mesenteric vein thromboses, isolated or not, were associated with symptoms and intestinal infarction in 69/75 (92%) and 34/75 (45%), respectively

Portal Vein Thrombosis (PVT): Symptoms, Causes, and Treatmen

Isolated thrombosis of the portal vein after trauma is exceptional, 4 and there are only 8 documented cases published in the literature. 5 We report the case of a woman who presented with atrophy of the right liver and cirrhosis established 7 years after injury to the right hypochondrium, which had not been treated surgically Isolated splenic vein thrombosis (ISVT) usually results in left-side portal hypertension and isolated gastric fundal varices.92 The most common cause of ISVT is chronic pancreatitis, with a reported incidence of up to 45%.92 Occasionally splenic vein thrombosis has been described in relation to pancreatic pseudotumor, pancreatic pseudocyst, retroperitoneal abscess, renal neoplasms, perirenal abscess, and segmental splenic vein resection during removal of a pancreatic tumor (iatrogenic cause) Isolated splenic vein thrombosis (ISVT) usually results in left-side portal hypertension and isolated gastric fundal varices.92 The most common cause of ISVT is chronic pancreatitis, with a reported incidence of up to 45%. 92 Occasionally splenic vein thrombosis has been described in relation to pancreatic pseudotumor, pancreatic pseudocyst, retroperitoneal abscess, renal neoplasms, perirenal abscess, and segmental splenic vein resection during removal of a pancreatic tumor (iatrogenic cause) clot can be occluding or non-occluding. isolated thrombus can occur in the splenic vein (rare in SMV or IMV alone) mesenteric thrombosis occurs when all the mesenteric veins are occluded with thrombus. over time recanalisation and collateral vessel formation can occur (portal cavernoma) Complications. portal hypertension without ascites

Isolated splenic vein thrombosis (SVT) is often secondary to pancreatic disorders including pancreatic cancer, pseudocysts, pancreatic abscess, and especially pancreatitis, occurring in up to 22% of patients with acute pancreatitis and 12% of patients with chronic pancreatitis. 68, 69 SVT often causes left-sided or sinistral portal. HCCs with portal vein thrombosis also frequently fail to meet the characteristic HCC enhancement profile despite being larger than 2 cm in size . In such situations, a biopsy is warranted. Third was the challenge of biopsying a mass in the portal vein in a patient with elevated INR of 1.75 and already on anticoagulants

Pathological complete response after percutaneous isolated

Portal vein thrombosis: When to treat and how

Antithrombotic treatment of splanchnic vein thrombosis (SVT) is a clinical challenge. Depending on the site of thrombosis, patients are at risk of developing liver insufficiency, portal hypertension, or bowel infarction and may experience recurrence in both the splanchnic veins and other vein segments Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) is the occlusion of the portal vein by a thrombus. The portal vein is a vital vessel that provides up to 75% of blood supply to the liver. While PVT occurs in both the. This is one of the largest studies of adult, primary isolated liver transplantation complicated with portal vein thrombosis. If physiological portal inflow is not reestablished in patients with portal vein thrombosis, they have significantly greater risk of complications due to residual portal hypertension, and thus suffer diminished long-term. Pathology. Following thrombosis, the portal vein may or may not re-canalize. Re-canalization is seen more frequently in patients without cirrhosis or disease of the liver leading to inherently increased resistance to portal flow. In patients whose portal vein does not recanalize, or only partially re-canalizes, collateral veins (thought to be paracholedochal veins) dilate and become serpiginous Portal vein thrombosis may occur in the presence or absence of underlying liver disease, and a combination of local and systemic factors are increasingly recognized to be important in its development. than those with isolated PVT. 2 Bowel infarction is an important cause of mortality in patients with thrombosis of the portal venous system.

Isolated splenic vein thrombosis: an unusual cause and

[Isolated portal vein thrombosis: a rare complication of chronic pancreatitis]. Bail JP, Andivot T, Leal T, Menut P, Nousbaum JB, Charles JF. Ann Chir, 47(1):47-51, 01 Jan 1993 Cited by: 0 articles | PMID: 8498785. Revie BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To our knowledge, very few MR imaging data have been reported in isolated cortical venous thrombosis (ICoVT). The purpose of this study was to describe MR imaging features, including T2*gradient-echo (GE) sequence, in presumed ICoVT. MATERIALS AND METHODS: MR imaging examinations were performed in 8 patients with ICoVT (MR venography was performed in all patients and.

Isolated portal vein or combined superior mesenteric vein and portal vein thrombosis are known complications of acute pancreatitis [1, 2, 3, 5]. Involvement of splenic vein is most common in chronic pancreatitis . Venous thrombosis other than splanchnic circulation is very rare in patients of pancreatitis Isolated superior mesenteric vein thrombosis was detected in 4 patients (21%), isolated portal vein thrombosis occurred in 3 patients (15.8%), isolated inferior vein thrombosis was detected in 1 patients (5.3%), and combination of more than one vein thrombosis was detected in 9 patients (47.4%) However, presentation as an isolated malignant portal vein thrombosis without any evidence of obvious hepatoma-like lesions in the liver by imaging studies is extremely uncommon. We present an unusual case of HCC presenting as a malignant portal vein thrombus, proven on biopsy of the thrombus without any evidence of primary liver lesion Portal vein thrombosis may occur in the presence or absence of underlying liver disease, and a combination of local and systemic factors are increasingly recog-nized to be important in its development. Acute and chronic portal vein thrombosis have traditionally been considered separately, although a clear clinical distinc-tion may be difficult Renal vein thrombosis (RVT) is the most common thrombotic manifestation in neonates, particularly those born prematurely, accounting for 16% to 20% of all thromboembolic events, 7 and is mainly related to umbilical or femoral indwelling catheters reaching the inferior vena cava, whereas in adults, it is mainly associated with cancer (66%) and.

Asymptomatic deep vein thrombosis has been well recognized. In about 1% of the healthy general population, a venous thrombus in the leg, most cases of which occur as an isolated calf vein thrombus, can be detected by ultrasonography and has no clinical consequences during follow-up [].Also, asymptomatic pelvic vein thrombosis following vaginal delivery does not appear to have clinical. Isolated portal vein trunk/branch thrombosis was present in 53 (66.3%) patients. AT was started in 37 patients. AT was stopped in 17 (45.9%) patients, in 4 (10.8%) due to bleeding events. No variceal bleeding occurred while on AT. Anticoagulation was restarted in 6/17 (35.2%) patients due to rethrombosis Portal vein thrombosis unrelated to solid malignancy is common in patients with cirrhosis, but less frequently observed in patients without cirrhosis. Prompt diagnosis and management of acute symptomatic portal vein thrombosis are essential. Failure to detect and treat thromboses can result in mesenteric ischemia, chronic cavernous transformation, and complications of portal hypertension

Isolated splenic vein thrombosis (ISVT) usually results in left-side portal hypertension and isolated gastric fundal varices. 92 The most common cause of ISVT is chronic pancreatitis, with a reported incidence of up to 45%. 92 Occasionally splenic vein thrombosis has been described in relation to pancreatic pseudotumor, pancreatic pseudocyst. A total of 832 patients with splanchnic vein thrombosis (mean age, 53 ± 17 years; 42% women) including isolated portal (n = 329), mesenteric (n = 76), splenic (n = 62), and hepatic (n = 45) vein thrombosis and 320 patients with multisegmental involvement underwent evaluation at the Mayo Clinic and had complete follow-up data ().Imaging modalities used to make the diagnosis included computed.

Portal vein thrombosis Radiology Reference Article

Gastric varices are dilated submucosal veins in the lining of the stomach, which can be a life-threatening cause of bleeding in the upper gastrointestinal tract.They are most commonly found in patients with portal hypertension, or elevated pressure in the portal vein system, which may be a complication of cirrhosis.Gastric varices may also be found in patients with thrombosis of the splenic. portal vein with extension into both right and left portal veins and small isolated varices (arrow) in gastric fundus. C, D. Coronal reformatted contrast-enhanced CT scan at 2 week follow up shows interval decrease in size of portal vein thrombosis, new inferior mesenteric vein thrombosis The term splanchnic vein thrombosis encompasses Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS), extrahepatic portal vein obstruction (EHPVO), and mesenteric vein thrombosis; the simultaneous involvement of additional regions is frequent, and clinical presentations and risk factors may be shared. The annual incidence of BCS and isolated mesenteric vein thrombosis is less than one per million individuals, while the. Although thrombosis of this system is uncommon, improved imaging has led to an increased incidence of this phenomenon.1 A 20-year case-controlled study showed that fewer than half of cases of splanchnic vein thrombosis involved multiple vessels, with the most common location being isolated portal vein thrombosis followed by multivessel disease.

A single hospital study on portal vein thrombosis in

Anticoagulation in Cirrhosis and Portal Vein Thrombosis Is

Although the effectiveness of perioperative adjuvant therapy in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has been investigated, the efficacy of preoperative therapy is unclear. Herein, we report a case of pathological complete response after percutaneous isolated hepatic perfusion (PIHP) for HCC involving portal vein tumor thrombosis (PVTT) The effects of splenic vein thrombosis on normal venous anatomy. Note the gastric varices, dilatation of short gastric, and gastroepiploic (GEV) and coronary (CV) veins. The portal vein (PV), superior mesenteric vein (SMV), and inferior mesenteric vein (IMV) are patent. RGV: right gastric vein; SV: splenic vein Portal Diabetes can be prevented following total pancreatectomy vein thrombosis, hepatic infarction, and disseminated with autologous islet cell transplantation if the number of intravascular coagulation all have been reported in hu- cells isolated from the diseased pancreas is adequate Tumor invasion into the portal vein by direct venous extension or metastasis occurs in up to 70% of HCC patients (Cedrone et al., Liver 16:94-8, 1996). However, presentation as an isolated malignant portal vein thrombosis without any evidence of obvious hepatoma-like lesions in the liver by imaging studies is extremely uncommon

Cureus | Isolated Radial Vein Thrombosis: Upper ExtremityClick HereDoppler ultrasound of portal vein thrombosis

Portal vein thrombosis: When to treat and how? - Aditya M

Ovarian vein thrombosis is an uncommon event historically attributed to either pelvic inflammatory disease or the postpartum period. In recent years, gynecologic surgery and pelvic malignancy have emerged as important causative associations. 1-4 Ovarian vein thrombosis is estimated to complicate 1 per 600 to 1 per 2,000 pregnancies, typically in the postpartum period Isolated umbilical vein thrombosis in the adult population is a rare occurrence. To the best of our knowledge, there have been no reported cases in the literature. Incidental isolated umbilical vein thrombosis in neonates has occurred as a consequence following umbilical vein catheterisation [4, 5]. Pancreatitis is an inflammatory process and.

Liver College of American Pathologist

The occurrence of isolated splenic vein thrombus with TB has been rarely reported earlier [1, 2]. In our case, though we could not establish histologic or microbiologic evidence of TB in splenic tissue, the resolution of abscesses and splenic vein thrombus with ATT made us confident that TB was the culprit behind this atypical presentation Splenic vein thrombosis should be suspected in the following groups of patients: (1) those with a history of pancreatitis and newly diagnosed GI bleeding, (2) patients with splenomegaly but no portal hypertension, cirrhosis, or hematologic disease, and (3) individuals with isolated gastric varices 3. There are many other causes of GI bleeding. §Excludes isolated headaches. **In ICBD defined as arterial thrombosis, large vein thrombosis, phlebitis, and superficial phlebitis; in PEDBD as venous thrombosis, arterial thrombosis, arterial aneurysm. ††If pathergy testing is conducted, one extra point may be assigned for a positive result Documenta - Hospital São Francisco, Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brazil. A: Non-contrast-enhanced abdominal CT of the patient at admission, showing increased density of mesenteric fat around the sigmoid colon (arrowhead), where some colonic diverticula were also present, suggesting an inflammatory process.

Duplex Doppler endosonography in the diagnosis of splenic

What is the Life Expectancy with Portal Vein Thrombosis

Background: Abdominal pain is a common primary care complaint. Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) is a rare cause of abdominal pain, typically associated with cirrhosis or thrombophilia. The following describes the presentation of PVT in a young male, the search for risk factors and underlying etiology, and the debate of anticoagulation therapy. Case: A 28-year-old male presented with periumbilical. The significance of an isolated, mild elevation of IgG in a patient is not clear. 13 The presence of antiphospholipid antibodies predisposes to both arterial and venous thrombosis. 14 Portal vein thrombosis was reported in one patient from a series of 800 in which the level of elevation of IgG, the partial thromboplastin time, the value of.

Survival and Recurrence in Patients With Splanchnic VeinDoppler ultrasound in deep vein thrombosis

Portal vein thrombosis is a common complication of liver cirrhosis, especially at the decompensated or advanced stage. The reported prevalence was 10-25% by ultrasound. The effect of PVT on the natural history of liver cirrhosis is not clear, especially the non-occlusive PVT. Isolated splenic vein thrombosis or isolated superior mesenteric. Isolated involvement of a cortical vein is unusual and predominantly described in case reports (6, 7). Cortical vein thrombosis is usually secondary to dural sinus thrombosis, with thrombus propagating in a retrograde fashion from the occluded sinus . There are myriad predisposing factors for cerebral venous thrombotic disease METHODS:: We performed a retrospective cohort analysis of all consecutive adult patients who underwent primary isolated liver transplantation from 1998 to 2009 (median follow-up period, 89 months). The outcomes of patients with PVT were compared with those without PVT. When and why portal vein thrombosis matters in liver transplantation. T2. {{configCtrl2.info.metaDescription}} This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse this site you are agreeing to our use of cookies This case is being presented to highlight isolated portal venous thrombosis in the absence of pancreatitis, cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma. Portal vein thrombosis may be seen in a variety of clinical contexts, and when acute can be a life-threatening condition. It is a major cause of noncirrhotic presinusoidal portal hypertension The association between hepatic lobar atrophy and ipsilateral portal vein obstruction is well known and has been described in patients with isolated portal vein obstruction or those with cholangiocarcinoma, resulting in both portal vein and biliary obstruction . Further details are shown in Figure E1 (online). In the latter, portal vein.